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Information on Military Divorce for Active Military Personnel

The road leading to a divorce might be a long and hard one for some people, and it is further complicated when one spouse is an active-duty military personnel. If you are just starting the divorce process, you might be wondering, “How long does a military divorce take?” The path may seem like it is littered with lots of legal jargon that is difficult to understand. However, a divorce should not be that way, and anyone in the military and their spouses can get help with divorce papers by retaining the guidance of a divorce lawyer. There are a few legal issues that need to be worked out when one of the people within the marriage is in the military.

It is all about having someone by your side that understands the Mesa AZ military divorce lawyer rate and the steps in the divorce process. Having the right legal help in the form of a military divorce attorney can reduce the stress and emotional strain on you and your family as you navigate through the local and state laws regarding divorce for military persons. Keep in mind that it will also depend on which state you reside in and the divorce laws within that state.

It is advised that anyone in the military who would like to file for divorce should do so within the United States to avoid any potential problems. The military divorce laws make it possible for somebody to file in the state where they are stationed. It is also possible to file in the state where the nonmilitary spouse currently lives or the state which the military spouse has claimed as their residency.

There are other issues for the two people who are contemplating divorce when one person is in the military. For example, if the military member abandons their spouse without letting them know and without letting them know whether they will be returning, then the nonmilitary spouse is still considered to be married in the case of abandonment, and they have legal rights to obtain spousal and child support. It is important to note that divorces that occur outside of the United States will not be recognized by an American court.

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